Leadership

Key findings from ten years of commitment and innovation in progressing BAME people in the workplace.
The race equality awards were established to provide a vehicle for employers to showcase best practice. The past ten years have provided a rich source of best practice and guidance collated in this document with a focus on Leadership / Progression / Recruitment / Engagement / and Impact. 
Key findings
•    BAME women are least likely to hold executive directorships and non- executive directorships•    BAME women are more likely to be promoted than BAME men •    Executive directorships are less likely to be diverse by gender and ethnicity than non-executive directorships•    White employees are more likely to be promoted than all other groups 
 
Opportunity Now members sign in / register to access the in depth analysis
 
Key findings
•    Women are twice as likely to make formal complaints than men •    BAME employees are more likely to make formal complaints than white employees•    BAME women are most likely to make a formal complaint •    Organisations are taking more steps to turn ‘zero-tolerance’ policy into lived reality •    Increase in number of organisations monitoring and action planning to make proactive interventions 
114 organisations took part in the 2014 Gender and Race Benchmark; 27 from the public sector and 87 from the private sector. 86 organisations submitted data on ethnicity. 
 
Opportunity Now members sign in / register to access the in depth analysis
Project 28-40 seeks to identify the hidden tensions within workplace cultures that are preventing the creation of more gender-balanced workforces. In the 21st century, the ‘male breadwinner’ workplace model of full-time, long hours and no external commitments has to change.
Since publishing the Project 28-40 report in April 2014, Opportunity Now has conducted further research into the experiences of women of all ages in different sectors. These papers set out the findings from our analysis of Project 28-40’s sector data, validated by qualitative data from focus groups with women in each sector . Each of the papers should be read in conjunction with the original report.
We hope these papers will further enable you to take action, recognising the unique challenges of your sector.
If you are serious about change, you as Partners and senior leaders need to take the lead on women’s progression, moving this from a diversity initiative to a core business priority.
Create a truly agile organisation, with women and men able to work in a way that makes them productive and engaged.




There’s a real issue with private practice, and top firms are particularly challenging for women. I believe the reason is there’s an inherently male culture in these sorts of firms, where the sacrifices that you are expected to make to progress - and the whole chargeable hours structure that rewards putting in the long hours - means that long hours are rewarded.




- Focus Group Participant

Demonstrate visible leadership in tackling bullying, harassment and sexual harassment; send a clear message to all employees that poor behaviour should be called out and turn ‘zero tolerance’ policy into a reality. Provide informal methods of reporting.
Consult with women in your organisation about the changes they would like see to enable more women to succeed.
Implement more job share roles. We have seen this successfully piloted in management consultancies, with job sharing consultants managing one project and communicating this upfront with the client.
Ensure accountability at Partner level on meeting gender targets and set objectives for this, just as you have for billing.

If you are serious about change, you as Service Chiefs and senior leaders need to take the lead on women’s progression, moving this from a diversity initiative to an operational effectiveness priority.Demonstrate visible leadership in tackling bullying, harassment and sexual harassment. Send a clear message to all employees that poor behaviour should be called out and turn ‘zero tolerance’ policy into a reality.Create a truly agile organisation, with women and men able to work in a way that makes them productive and engaged. Look at job design, technology and agile teams, and defeat the flexible working stigma that holds women – and men – back.Recognise that working in a male dominated culture places specific and additional demands upon female personnel. This requires you to consult with women in your organisation to develop your understanding of what it is like to be a woman in a man's world. These women have expressed genuine concerns that you need to address.

If you are serious about change, you as CEO's need to take the lead on women’s progression, moving this from a diversity initiative to a core business priority.




Without senior women, why would you think you can progress? You need to see them at all levels so you know you can be there too.




- Focus Group Participant

Create a truly agile organisation, with women and men able to work in a way that makes them productive and engaged.
Demonstrate visible leadership in tackling bullying, harassment and sexual harassment; send a clear message to all employees that poor behaviour should be called out and turn ‘zero tolerance’ policy into a reality. Provide informal methods of reporting.
Consult with women in your organisation about the changes they would like see to enable more women to succeed.
For the purposes of our analyis and report, we refer to this group of industries collectively as the STEM sector:  This includes, Construction, Manufacturing, Oil, Gas, Electricity, Water Supply, Waste Management, Scientific & Technical Services and Telecommunications / Information Technology.
Race at the Top’ is the most comprehensive picture of Black, Asian and minority ethnic (BAME) representation in leadership in UK business today. It finds that there has been virtually no ethnicity change in top management positions in the five years between 2007 and 2012.‘



17 Sept 2014: The FRC has released updates to the UK Corporate Governance Code – including the significant inclusion of ‘and race’. The FRC now clearly defines diversity as ‘gender and race’ when referencing the importance of diversity at board level as a means of ‘establishing tone from the top’ to influence corporate culture, value and business strategy. The addition of ‘and race’ has been included within the preface to the 2014 Code and for consultation for the 2016 Code.







By 2051, one in five people in the UK will be from an ethnic minority background, representing a scale of consumer spending and political voting power that business and government alike cannot afford to ignore. The gap must not be allowed to widen further, but without action, little will change. I am calling on government for a ‘Lord Davies’ review to amplify understanding around the barriers BAME employees face in reaching management positions, and for two simple words – “and race” – to be added to the UK Corporate Governance Code. We urgently need these to happen if we are to ensure that we don’t pass the point of no return.




- Sandra Kerr OBE,

Campaign Director, Race for Opportunity
Sadly, the pipeline does not give us hope for the future; the gap at management level has worryingly widened between 2007 and 2012.  
In the UK today, one in 10 employed people are BAME, yet only one in 16 of top management positions and one in 13 management positions are held by BAME people.  By 2051, one in five people in the UK will be from an ethnic minority background, representing a scale of consumer spending and political voting power that business and government alike cannot afford to ignore . The gap must not be allowed to widen further, but without action, little will change.  This is about business sense, not moral pleading.  
Race for Opportunity is calling for a government review into racial barriers in the workplace that is akin to the Lord Davies review into gender, and for two words - ‘and race’ - to be added to the UK Corporate Governance Code.
We believe that this government-led action will be a powerful force for creating change, and without it the current intake of BAME workers will be unable to progress equally and fairly compared to their white counterparts.  
The campaign is also calling on employers in all sectors to do more to attract and retain BAME workers and ensure equal progression, and we make recommendations in the report to support this. 
Race at the Top Key Findings
Race for Opportunity Members - Sign in to access the full report
 


If you are serious about change, CEOs and senior leaders need to take the lead on women’s progression, moving this from a diversity initiative to a core business priority. Set aspirational targets for the numbers of women you want to see at each senior level in your organisation.
Prioritise the development of excellent managers at every level of your organisation
Create a truly agile organisation, with women and men able to work in a way that makes them productive and engaged. Look at job design, technology, agile teams, and defeat the flexible working stigma that holds women back. Allow for non linear careers – your top talent will have times in their lives they need to take a step back.
Recognise that harassment and bullying still occurs, despite well-meaning policies. Call it out, deal with perpetuators, and make it simple and straightforward to report.
28 – 40 women: Build your network – be in a position to know about opportunities as they come up. Get real on sponsorship – identify senior people who will advocate for you. If you want a mentor, ask them.